Plant-based eating

Balance of plant/animal-based

Rationale for re-balancing

Plant-based diets shift the balance in favor of plant foods. However it’s not necessary to eliminate all animal products. Eating smaller amounts of animal foods, and replacing them with more plant-based foods, can bring about major benefits to both our health and the planet.

There are different types of plant-based eating.

Plant-based foods are defined as fruit and vegetables, whole-grains, legumes, nuts and seeds and plant-based dairy alternatives.

It’s widely accepted that to achieve a healthy balanced diet, two thirds of it should come from plant foods and one third from animal based products. This is because plant foods contain more fiber, vitamins and minerals and less fat and saturated fat than animal foods. As such this way of eating has been associated with proven benefits to our health and is in line with national and international dietary recommendations.

The American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) has developed a visual of the new American plate. The aim is for meals to be made up of 2/3 (or more) vegetables, fruits whole grains or beans and 1/3 (or less) animal protein. AICR guide you through a transition from a traditional plate to new and exciting patterns for eating.

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Alpro Foundation published in 2015, the new edition of “The Plant-based Plan: 10 scientific reasons for more plant-based eating” – a Reference Guide for Plant-based nutrition.

Articles

What is Plant-based Eating?

Interview with Lynne Garton

date
15.09.2016

Dr Timothy Key: EPIC-Oxford study – main findings

Dr Timothy Key (Oxford University, UK) explains the main findings from the EPIC-Oxford study regarding difference between vegetarians and meat-eaters in terms of health.

date
13.09.2016

Dr Timothy Key: EPIC-Oxford study – design

Dr Timothy Key (Oxford University, UK) explains the design of the EPIC-Oxford study and the main findings.

date
13.09.2016

Lynne Garton explains the UK Eatwell Guide

Lynne Garton, co-author of “The Plant-based Plan”, briefly explains the role of plant-based eating and particular soya in the new Eatwell Guide from UK.

date
13.09.2016

Main findings from Adventist Health study

Dr Gary Fraser explains the main findings from the Adventist Health study: BMI, diabetes risk, blood pressure and quality of life in relation to plant-based eating.

date
09.06.2016

What is Adventist Health study

Dr Gary Fraser explains the set-up of the Adventist Health study and the main benefits for vegetarians.

date
09.06.2016